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Restoration dpt.

CHEVAL MARIN

OBJECT RESTAURANT & HOUSING PROJECT

LOCATION QUAI AUX BRIQUES / MARCHE AUX PORCS - 1000 BRUSSELS

PHASE ACHIEVED

CLIENT PRIVATE

PARTNERS JZH ENGINEERING

 

The original baroque building dating from 1680, presumably the Brussels port warden house, was acquired by the city administration in 1893. Having been surveyed in detail, the building was completely dismantled and reconstructed in 1899 by Hubert MARCQ (1864-1925) according to its historic design but using 19th-century materials such as Boom bricks, Euville and Gobertange limestone and granite (commonly known as ‘pierre bleue’ or ‘Petit Granit’). However, its plinth, quoins and courses in sandstone (grès Lédien) appear to be original 17th-century elements.

In 1919 the adjacent house facing Marché aux Porcs was incorporated by Appolon LAGACHE who also designed new interiors, its main feature being the elaborate lounge in Flemish Neorenaissance. Up to 1999 the building housed a renown restaurant, ‘Le Cheval Marin’ (The Sea Horse); it was listed as a monument in 2003.

Restoration work by ARTER was begun in 2016, the programme being to re-install a restaurant on ground and first floor level and appartment housing on the two upper levels. A key intervention will be the dismantling and reconstruction of the slate roof structure, of which original elements still subsist.

 

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​© 2018 by ÁRTER Architects

    The contents contained in this website are copyright protected.

    No person may download, duplicate, reproduce, edit or publish any content contained in whole or in part without prior written permission of              ÁRTER Architects.